Carl McColman presents:

In the Footsteps of Saint Francis: 

Exploring the Link Between Mysticism and Social Action



Friday, October 18:  5:30 pm potluck dinner; 6:30-8:00 pm presentation
Saturday, October 19: 8:30 am complimentary continental breakfast; 9:00 - 10:30 am, presentation and Q&A

Note: If you plan to attend the potluck supper before the presentation, don’t forget to bring your own table setting: plates, cups and cutlery! Those who don’t choose to attend the supper are more than welcome to come just for the program that begins at 6:30.

In Adshead Hall (lower level of Fletcher House on the Uplands Village Campus)
86A Church Dr, Pleasant Hill, 38578, (just off Main St. across from Pleasant Hill Elementary School)

The German theologian Karl Rahner famously said "The Christian of the future will be a mystic or will not exist." But in the minds of many, mysticism sounds like escapism: a spiritual "bypass" that hides away in meditation and avoids the challenges of today's world. Yet if we look at the great mystics of the past — from St. Francis in the 12th century to Thomas Merton in the 20th — we can see that the greatest mystics were often profoundly engaged with the social, political, and moral crises of their time. 


In our program, led by Carl McColman, author of The Big Book of Christian Mysticism, we'll reflect on how mysticism and social action belong together just as surely as do breathing in and breathing out. We'll pay special attention to the beloved Italian friar, Francis of Assisi, but our exploration will likely cover a wide terrain as we seek to find the connection between meditation and activism — and how to embrace that connection in our own lives.


The Coming Paradigm Shift: Consciousness is Fundamental and Why It Matters with Ed Olson and Karen Woods




2019 FALL Semester Short Course Registration Form

Please fill out a separate registration form for each person enrolling.

The Coming Paradigm Shift: Consciousness is Fundamental and Why It Matters
Instructors – Dr. Ed Olson and Karen Woods

       Tuesdays, 10 am – 11:30 am, Oct 15 - NOV 12, 2019
Meets in Room 1 at Pleasant Hill Community Church - UCC, 67 Church Drive, Pleasant Hill
Cost $20.00 ($10.00 for 2019 ULLI members)

This course explains our current dualistic (Mind and Matter) paradigm and the non-dual new model of reality: the interconnectedness of all things and the power of consciousness to influence physical reality and the holistic nature of human experience. We will explore the implications for our relationships, religion, ethics and morality and peer into the future of artificial intelligence, the evolution of our images of God and perspectives on life after death.

 Ed Olson, Ph.d, taught in colleges and universities for 40 years. Currently, he leads workshops for churches and the Chautauqua Institution in applying complexity and quantum theory to issues in science, spirituality, and religion.

 Karen Woods completed bachelor’s degrees in philosophy and nursing as well as an Associate of Science degree-Veterinary Technician.  She has more than 25 years of nursing experience encompassing Neuro ICU, nurse education and hospice case management. Her spiritual journey includes ten years as a professed Sister in the Worker Sisters of the Holy Spirit where she served four of those years as their Spiritual Director.  Karen is now an ordained Zen Buddhist and dharma teacher.






John Siewert
presents
Public Art:
Meaning, Monuments, and Social Change


Friday, July 19: Unstable Objects: Public Art and Social Change
5:30 pm potluck dinner; 6:30 - 8:00 pm presentation

Saturday, July 20: Monuments of Reconciliation in the Contemporary South
8:30 am complimentary continental  breakfast;
9:00 - 10:30 am, presentation and Q&A
Note: If you plan to attend the potluck supper before the presentation, don't forget to bring your own table setting: plates, cups and cutlery! Those who don't choose to attend the supper are more than welcome to come just for the program that begins at 6:30.

In Adshead Hall (lower level of Fletcher House on the Uplands Village Campus)
86A Church Dr, Pleasant Hill, 38578, (just off Main St. across from Pleasant Hill Elementary School)

John Siewert is professor of modern and contemporary art and architectural history at The College of Wooster (Ohio). He received his BA in history of art from the University of Minnesota and his PhD from the University of Michigan. A former Fulbright, Henry Luce,  and Terra Foundation Fellow, he was the Smithsonian Senior Fellow in Art History for 2012-13 at the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington, DC, and he holds an appointment as honorary research fellow at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. He publishes and lectures widely on varied topics in modern American and British art, including issues in the recent history of public monuments and memorials.

Uplands Lifelong Learning Institute

Dara Gell of Innocence Project: Program May 10-11








Dara Gell

Investigations Attorney for the Innocence Project



           



Fri May 10 - Wrongful Convictions: Proving Innocence?
5:30 pm potluck dinner; 6:30 - 8:00 pm presentation


Sat May 11 - Wrongful Convictions: Proving Innocence?  Continued
8:30 am complimentary continental breakfast 
9:00 - 10:30 am, presentation and Q&A  
Note: If you plan to attend the potluck supper before the presentation, please bring your own table setting:plates, cups and cutlery! Those who don’t choose to attend  the supper are more than welcome to come just for the program beginning at 6:30.

In Adshead Hall (lower level of Fletcher House on the Uplands Village Campus)
86A Church Dr, Pleasant Hill, 38578, (just off Main St. across from Pleasant Hill Elementary School)

Dara Gell has been the Innocence Project's Investigations Attorney since October, 2017. She previously worked with the organization as student intern during law school. Before joining the Innocence Project staff she was a practicing immigration defense attorney in New York City, defending individuals and families from deportation in federal immigration court. She holds a BA from State University of New York at Geneseo, and a JD from Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. 


The Innocence Project, founded in 1992 by Peter Neufeld and Barry Scheck at Cardozo School of Law, exonerates the wrongly convicted through DNA testing and reforms the criminal justice system to prevent future injustice.






Three New Short Courses for Spring 2019


We are pleased to announce 3 more short courses to complete our Spring 2019 Semester. Courses are $20 ($10 per course for those who have a 2019 ULLI membership). All courses take place in Room 1, Pleasant Hill Community Church, 67 Church Dr, Pleasant Hill, Tennessee. For directions, click here.

Tuition is $20 ($10 for 2019 ULLI Members) for each course. To learn more about and register for any of these courses, you may obtain a Course Registration Form by clicking on the course titles below, emailing ullipleasanthill@gmail.com, or by calling President Don Dowdey at (931) 277-3033. Paper copies are available on the Uplands information porch at Heritage and at the Pleasant Hill Community Church.



Tuesdays, April 2-23, 2:30 - 4:00 pm
Room 1, Pleasant Hill Community Church
As we face difficult moral, political, social, and economic decisions, we long to be certain about what is real and true. But often we are locked into one or two ways of knowing, of seeing a desired outcome. In this course we use multiple ways of knowing about what is true  to unlock new possibilities. We will analyze current news topics, “fake news” and important issues identified by the participants to gain a closer approximation to what is true and what we can do about it.
Ed Olson, Ph.D., taught in colleges and universities for 40 years. Currently, he leads workshops for churches and the Chautauqua Institution.  He has taught a course and done a Saturday Seminar for ULLI in the past.

Thursdays, April 11 – May 30, 10:00 - 11:30 am
Room 1, Pleasant Hill Community Church
In this course we will read and discuss seven short stories. Each story explores the complexity involved in relationships with others and how this complexity plays a significant role in our sense of who we are. Because the substance of each meeting will be a discussion of a particular story, it is important that each participant read and think about the story before we meet. Each of the stories will be provided in a digital format, and, if requested, in printed format. Discussion-starter questions will be distributed to participants before each class session. We will be reading stories by Graham Greene, Flannery O’Conner, Raymond Carver, among others.

Ron Johnson has been an English teacher and a pastor. He has a MAT in teaching English, a PhD in English and American Literature and an MDiv. This is his second course for us.

               Tuesdays, April 30 - May 14, 2:30 - 4:00 pm
               Room 1, Pleasant Hill Community Church
Dealing with differences as manifested in the diversity of race, gender, age, sexual orientation, class, and religion require being fully present in our engagement with others. Contemplative practice rewires our inner life, freeing us from self-oriented and distorted understandings about persons who are different from us. To see the divine in another person is to recognize and discover one’s own diversity. Participants will practice seeing that our fundamental interconnectedness is essential to dismantling the patterns that lead to bias and oppression.

Troy Smith of Tennessee Tech on Native Americans in East Tennessee



Uplands Lifelong Learning Institute (ULLI)(Formerly the Shalom Center for Continuing Education)


Troy Smith


Presents

Native Americans

in East Tennessee












Friday, March 15:Native Tennessee-Indians in the pre-contact and colonial period
5:30 pm potluck dinner; 6:30 - 8:00 pm presentation

Saturday, March 16: Birth of a (Cherokee) Nation: 
The Trail to the Trail of Tears
8:30 am complimentary continental breakfast;
9:00 - 10:30 am, presentation and Q&A


Note: If you plan to attend the potluck supper before the presentation, don’t forget to bring your own table setting:plates, cups and cutlery!  Those who don’t choose to attend the supper are
more than welcome to come j
ust for the program that begins at 6:30.


In Adshead Hall(lower level of Fletcher House on the 
Uplands Village Campus) 
86A Church Dr, Pleasant Hill, 38578,(just off Main St. across from 
Pleasant Hill Elementary School)

Troy D. Smith is an associate professor of history at Tennessee Tech, where he received his BA(with MA and Ph.D at the University of Illinois). He teaches American Indian Studies, the American West, and Environmental History. He is also a novelist and two-time winner of Western Writers of America's Spur Award (other past winners include Louis L'Amour, Larry McMurtry, and Quintin Tarantino). His most recent fiction is a short story about Tonto in The Lone Ranger and Tonto: Frontier Justice, by Moonstone Press (for which he also wrote the introduction, about the history of the character.

Uplands Lifelong Learning Institute (ULLI)
www.ullipleasanthill.org


Shalom Center for Continuing Education is Getting a New Name

After almost 20 years of service to the community, and to better reflect the wide range of educational topics offered to the community, the current board of directors has renamed the life-long learning center.  The new name, “Uplands Lifelong Learning Institute,” or ULLI, is in keeping with similar organizations across the country who strive to facilitate learning throughout the lifespan of individuals, encouraging the intellectually curious well into their later years.  Shalom Center has made such learning opportunities affordable and accessible to our area residents and enjoys a proud history of bringing celebrated speakers to the Uplands and Cumberland County vicinity.  

The original Shalom Center was formed in the year 2000, by a group led by Ted Braun.  The goal was to establish an educational “Chautauqua-like” organization promoting life-long learning for the residents of Pleasant Hill and the greater Cumberland Plateau area.  Shalom’s “Statement of Purpose” included the following:

The Shalom Center for Continuing Education is a non-profit educational center whose purpose is to provide opportunities for holistic education in areas of social, economics, cultural, ecological, ethical, and theological importance on behalf of shalom (wholeness, health, and peace). 

Through conferences, workshops, forums, retreats, institutes, and courses the Shalom Center seeks to engage those in Pleasant Hill and beyond in learning process that is lifelong, inclusive, imaginative, and celebrative, recognizing the integrity of creation and the unity of its inhabitants.”

Despite the overall positive tone of the word “Shalom,” it has often been perceived as strictly a religious term, giving some people the impression that we are a religious group, or that we only present religiously focused programs. In fact, a wide range of topics have been covered, including music, activists/martyrs, war and peace, church and state, faith into action, domestic violence, trauma healing, homophobia, sustainable agriculture, care of the earth, Native American perspectives, and interfaith issues. Over the past year, we’ve offered topics regarding East Tennessee involvement in the Civil War, Peace Corps volunteer experiences around the world, environmental policy issues, as well as spiritual and religious topics. Many regionally and nationally renowned speakers and authors have graciously agreed to present on a variety of subjects, with several committed to this year’s schedule.

Two Spring Short Courses are starting soon: 

Understanding American Identity: Divided and/or United with Mark Canfield beginning Friday Feb 22 (10-11:30, Rm 1 Pleasant Hill Community Church) 

Bridge for Fun (and good for your brain too!) with Pat Harley beginning Friday Mar 1 (1:30-3:30). 

More information and a registration form for these two classes are available using the Spring 2019 Short Courses tab above.  We hope to see you there!

Other short courses beginning later include two shorter courses with Ed Olson, (Apr 2-Apr 23) and Spirituality of Difference (April 30-May 14). Both will be Tuesday 10-11:30 in Rm 1 of PHCC. Also, we expect to offer a course on short stories this semester. More info and registration forms for these courses will be available shortly.

Confirmed program for 2019 include: 

Native Americans in East Tennessee, with Dr. Troy Smith of Tennessee Tech (Mar 15-16)

  • Friday March 15 6:30 pm Native Tennessee- Indians in the pre-contact and colonial period 
  • Saturday March 16 (:30 am): Birth of a (Cherokee) Nation: the trail to the Trail of Tears 

Dara Gell with The Innocence Project (May 10-11),

Carl McColman, Professed Lay Cistercian, writer, soul friend, storyteller, and retreat leader, on Spirituality, (Oct 18-19)

John Siewert, Professor of Art and Art History at the College of Wooster, on current and continuing debates about Confederate Monuments and Public Art (summer, date TBA).

We are in the process of finalizing an offering on defining and describing one’s Legacy, with Sabina Coronado.

Programs will continue to be held at Adshead Hall at Uplands Village, 86A Church Drive, Pleasant Hill, TN

Information about upcoming events can be accessed using the tabs above.